Capped: Cost-Effective Multi-Category Studs

Eric Daoust

2014-01-30

JadenSchwartz


Who are the best bargains under $2 million?

 

It goes without saying that effective low-cost players are essential to building championship teams in salary cap leagues. This holds true in the NHL as well as in fantasy hockey. In order to win, you must get the most out of your allocated dollars. As an added bonus, the money you save can be used to upgrade your roster elsewhere or to keep a star-heavy roster together for additional championship runs.

 

In points-only leagues, identifying bargain talent is relatively easy. There are two reasons for this: having just points makes evaluating players a simpler task (one category) and point production is in many cases the strongest factor in determining player salary. For the most part, those that produce the most points are paid the most. For examples of current point-producing bargains, click here for higher-end forwards or here for best bang for your buck.

 

In multi-category leagues this task is much more complex. It is very difficult to figure out how to value one player versus another when it is not as simple as comparing their point production. Plus, each league setup is different which means that players have a different level of importance in each environment.

 

What makes multi-category leagues interesting is that some unexpected players can hold a ton of value in a particular format. Fantasy hockey is different from real-life hockey which creates some interesting dynamics as GMs try to build winning rosters. Those who can be unbiased and simply seek out players who are going to help them in their league put themselves in a very advantageous position.

 

 

Today we will look at some examples of cheap players that excel in a multi-category format.

 

We will use the United Hockey League, a deep league with many DobberHockey regulars, as our example. The reason for this is because, as a league where over 550 players are owned on the pro rosters alone along with most of the available categories, the cap bargains mentioned will appeal to just about everyone in some way. Additionally, the league is hosted in Fantrax which has its own league-specific player valuation formula. This makes the exporting of the data, along with corresponding player cap hits, much easier.


United Hockey League (dynasty)

 

Scoring setup: Head-to-Head
Teams: 24
Pro Rosters: 23 + 4 IR
Farm Rosters: 27 + one-year protection for newly-drafted prospects
Categories: G, A, +/-, PIM, SOG, GWG, PPP, SHP, Hit, Blk, FOW, W, GAA, SV, SV%, SO

 

Here is the breakdown of this league with player salaries versus the computed score for each player based on the 2013-14 NHL season. Only players with a score of 600 or better are considered (191 in total) to make sure we are sticking with the top of the pyramid when making observations.

 

capped pic

 

It is remarkable how many players among the league’s best have a small cap hit. Among the sample of players used, there are 40 players paid $2 million or less, meanin