20 Fantasy Hockey Thoughts

Mario Prata

2018-07-15

Every Sunday until the start of the 2018-19 regular season, we'll share 20 Fantasy Thoughts from our writers at DobberHockey. These thoughts are curated from the past week's "Daily Ramblings".

Writers: Michael Clifford, Ian Gooding, Cam Robinson, and Dobber

 

1. Vegas extended Marc-Andre Fleury for three years at seven million per. The club just bought up his age 35-37 seasons as the new deal won’t kick in until 2019-20. This is a big paycheque for an ageing netminder with a career .913 save percentage in all situations. His .923 save percentage at even strength the last decade is fine but not otherworldly.

The Golden Knights success last season has placed them in a weird spot. They’re now forced to ride the wave and continue to go for a Cup in the immediate future. That's a risky spot for a team still trying to build its organizational depth chart (i.e. stock the prospect cupboard).

There’s little reason to expect MAF to post anywhere near his career-high .927 mark he had from last season. If he can play at a .920-level, he'll be worth the money from a stability and marketing standpoint. However, this deal is rife with potential pitfalls. (july14)

 

2. You could quibble about whether Patrick Maroon ends up on St. Louis’ second or the third line but Robby Fabbri’s health will probably have a say in the matter.

Despite his size as a potential net-front presence, Maroon hasn’t been a huge power-play guy throughout his career, recording no more than eight power-play points in a season. But, it’s worth mentioning that the Blues had a dismal 15.4 percent power-play success rate in 2017-18 (only Edmonton’s was worse). And even though Maroon was a part of that Edmonton team for most of the season, I don’t think it would be out of the question for coach Mike Yeo to try Maroon on the first-unit power play at some point if it continues to struggle.

 

3. Jakob Chychrun is a blueliner I’ve been following since before he was drafted. I’ve never been a prospects guy but when I see someone who was highly touted have their draft stock fall, which invariably leads to them being drafted much lower than where they were even six months earlier, I take notice. The Coyotes obviously thought the same, as they trade