Wild West – General Manager Ratings – San Jose Sharks

Grant Campbell

2020-07-06

In part eleven of our look at the GMs of the Western Conference, we will look at Doug Wilson in San Jose. Wilson was the Director of Player Development in San Jose for five years before taking over as GM in 2003. 

Category Ratings: 

5: below average

6: average

7: above average

8: top ten

9: Exceptional 

10: Perfect

Overall ratings should be based at seven being average, but the biggest takeaway should be how each GM compares to the others.

Prior Ratings:

Bob Murray – Anaheim: 7.85

John Chayka – Arizona: 6.62

Brad Treliving – Calgary: 7.5

Stan Bowman – Chicago: 7.6

Joe Sakic – Colorado: 7.55

Jim Nill – Dallas: 7.225

Ken Holland – Edmonton: 6.925 (post-2009)

Rob Blake – Los Angeles: 7.025

David Poile – Nashville: 7.55

Doug Armstrong – St. Louis: 8.0

San Jose Sharks

GM – Doug Wilson – hired May 13th, 2003

The first category, winning:

Regular-season record: 710 W 409 L 12 T 71 OTL 64 SOL 0.617 Winning %

Best result and playoffs: The Sharks best regular season was in 2008-09 when they posted 53 wins and had 117 points. In the sixteen seasons under Wilson, the team has had 100 points or more nine times. As for the playoffs they made it to the Finals in 2015-16 only to lose in six games to the Pittsburgh Penguins. During Wilson's tenure, the Sharks also lost four times in round three of the playoffs in 2003-04, 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2018-19. 

Wilson inherited a team that had missed the playoffs in 2002-03 and had an ageing core consisting of Teemu Selanne (32), Vincent Damphousse (34), Owen Nolan (30), Mike Ricci (30), Scott Thornton (31), and Adam Graves (34).

Already on the team or in the system were Patrick Marleau (22), Marco Sturm (23), Scott Hannan (23), Jonathan Cheechoo (22), Brad Stuart (22), Christian Ehrhoff (21), and Ryane Clowe (20). 

Wilson didn't take over a club with tremendous depth or a great pipeline of prospects by any means.

Winning rating: 8.2

Drafting:

Doug Wilson took over completely with the 2003 draft and hit it out of the park in my opinion. He added Milan Michalek at 6th overall, Steve Bernier at 16th overall, Matt Carle in the 2nd round at 47th overall and the biggest prize of the bunch in the 7th round and 205th overall, Joe Pavelski.

The next year the team missed on their first-round pick at 22nd overall with Lukas Kaspar who only ended up playing 16 games in the NHL, but did hit on