May 14, 2013

Dobber Sports

2013-05-14

From J.P. of Japer’s Rink – Henrik Lundqvist’s save percentage for Games 5-7: 0.979. Jaroslav Halak’s for Games 5-7 in 2010: 0.978.

 

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Pittsburgh GM Ray Shero, Montreal GM Marc Bergevin and Anaheim GM Bob Murray were named finalists for the GM of the year award. I love the idea of this award, as it is an award that can also be given in fantasy hockey. But I hate the idea of basing the award on one-year performance. The best move that a GM ever makes in his career is almost always going to be a move that you don’t notice or see the dividends of until years later. The actual ‘best’ GM in 2012 we’ll know in 2015. How the league should set this up is to vote based on past five years performance (or for newer GM’s consider it as far back as possible). Which is why firing Brian Burke was so ludicrous – his body of work hadn’t even been completed yet though he still managed to build the worst team in NHL history up to a playoff team).

 

So for my money, I would consider Peter Chiarelli and Ray Shero, as well as Bryan Murray, Ken Holland, Dean Lombardi and yes – Garth Snow. I’ve never tore a strip off of Snow here because I know that he was just going through a rebuilding process and doing it on the cheap. But landing the likes of Nabokov was a good move, signing Parenteau and Moulson were brilliant (and no other GM would have done it), and remember when they offered all of their draft picks for just one? Ballsy! I like it. 

 

If you’re running a keeper league, you should consider having a GM of the Year award. Every year, review moves that were done 10 years prior – so this summer look at who the GMs drafted in 2003 and what trades they made. Pick out the three best, and email your league and have them vote. Present the trophy to the winner at the draft.

 

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More often than not, I feel like I could win a ton of money if I placed bets on the outcomes I would least like to happen. You?

Generally speaking, I will go for either of my two teams – the Leafs and the Penguins. And then, of course, the teams that best help my hockey pool. And then – the teams that I tout right here on this site, because if I’m right about them, then I look good and if I’m wrong I look bad. Right? So the Caps have to win for the latter reason, and the Rangers (specifically Brassard, as I’ve said here before I had traded him just before he was dealt and so I bitterly want him to fail) have to lose. And ideally, the games are put away early so I can get started on the ramblings.

So of the above “hopes” that I had, I get a big no, no, no and no. As I said, I could have bet hundreds on the Rangers winning, the Leafs losing, and one of the games going into overtime ;)

/whining

 

 

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So let’s break down the Leafs. For my money, the best players were Cody Franson, Jake Gardiner, James van Riemsdyk, Phil Kessel and Mikhail Grabovski. And I say this knowing that Grabovski had just two assists and was a minus-10. For those of you who didn’t watch this series, Grabovski held the puck in the Boston zone more than any other forward. He took more hits than anyone in the series and more often than not he came out of it with the puck.

Reimer goes without saying. To me, he solidified a place in the NHL’s Top 10 goalies.

But I can now say that, without a doubt, for all of Grabovski’s skill he has hands of stone.

The other player on the Leafs who controlled the flow of the play was Gardiner. He and Grabovski often looked as though they could play keep away all game long and no Bruin would get possession